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When submitting your files to be printed, there are a few simple mistakes that can sometimes delay the printing of your job. Avoiding these issues will ensure that your job is printed as timely as possible.


A

Accordion fold

A bindery term for two or more parallel folds that result in a sheet that opens like an accordion.


Aqueous Coating (AQ)

This is available in gloss or dull. A clear, non-toxic coating applied like ink by a printing press to protect the printed surface.


Artwork

In printing, this is the original copy which includes all text, graphics, photos and illustrations.

B

Back up

To print the reverse side of a sheet already printed on one side.

Bindery

The process that takes place after the printing has been complete. This includes cutting, scoring, folding, collating, stitching, and gluing.

Bitmap Images

Computerized image made up of a collection of dots or pixels; these images appear blocky when you zoom in; also known as raster images.

Bleed

A bleed is when an image extends beyond the trim edge of the printed product. If your image is not white on all four sides, you MUST include bleeds in your files. Add 1/8” (.125”) to each side of the file. For example, for a 4” x 6” postcard with full bleed, the image size should be submitted at 4.25” x 6.25”

Border

Margin or line between the image area and the edge of the paper.

Brightness

The brilliance or reflective quality of paper affecting contrast in printing.

C

C2S

Short for coating on both sides of paper.

CMYK

Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black. This is the industry standard process colors used in full- color offset printing. The combination of these four colors can produce a wide array of colors.

Colour Printing - CMYK

Coated paper

Paper with a thin surface coating of clay that produces a smooth finish.

Collate

The placement of printed sheets in numerical or alphabetical order.

Color correction

Methods of adjusting and improving color qualities such as color balance, contrast, etc.

Computer-to-Plate (CTP)

A technology that enables transfer of digital data directly to a metal plate for printing, eliminating the use of conventional films.

Cover paper

A heavyweight paper commonly used for covers of books, brochures, catalogs and folders.

Crop

To cut off sides or portions of an image.

Crop Marks

A thin pair of lines on each corner to show where the final cut will take place. 
For more information on the cutting process visit google.com and search for "Crop Marks".

Cure

The process of drying inks or coatings through chemical processes to develop strong adhesion.

Cutting Tolerance

The margin of error that a cutting machine has to cut paper can vary from 1/16 inch to 1/8 inch

Cyan

Shade of blue; One of four basic ink colors used in 4 color printing process.

D

Die

This is a device made out of sharp steel that is used to cut, score, stamp, emboss, or deboss irregular shapes.

Die Cutting

A process by which a template is made out of sharp steel and used to cut irregular shapes in printed sheets.

DPI (Dots Per Inch)

Also referred to as Pixels Per Inch (PPI), which is a measurement of resolution of a printed image determined by the number of dots that fit into one inch. For optimal results, your image must be at least 300 DPI/PPI at the final output size. Please do not attempt to change a low resolution image to a higher one by changing the DPI/PPI in your image software. Doing so will result in a blurred output.

Drop-out

Parts of artwork that are not reproduced.

Dummy

A product that is handmade by a graphic artist to show how the finished product will look. This is not created on the exact paper stock that the final product will be printed on.

E

Emboss

The process of stamping an image into paper so it is raised above the surface.

Encapsulated Postscript File (EPS)

An Adobe graphic file format for high resolution images; it translates graphic and text into code that tells a printer to print in the highest resolution possible and also has low resolution view files for quick screen viewing.

F

Final Size

The completed size after folding and bindery processes

Flat Size

The actual size of the product prior to folding or bindery processes

Foil Stamping

The process of stamping a heated die onto a sheet of foil which releases the foil from its backing and adhering to the paper, creating a foil design on a printed piece.

Full Color Printing

The process used in four-color printing when combining Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black.

G

Gate fold

A three or four panel fold where the two outside panels fold inward to meet in the center.

Ghosting

A printing defect where a faint unwanted image appears on a page.

Grain

The direction in which the fibers of a paper lie.

Grayscale

An image made up of a range of densities of black ink.

Grippers

The metal fingers on printing presses that hold the paper and controls it as it passes through the press or cutting machine.

H

Hard copy

A document or data printed on paper.

Hickey

The result when a spec of dust or debris adheres to the printing plate which creates a spot or imperfection on the final printed piece

House Stock

Paper kept in stock by a printer.

I

Image area

Portion of a page or paper that can be printed on.

Imposition

Arranging printed pages correctly so they will fold in the proper sequence.

Indicia

Postal information preprinted on a mailing envelope or a piece in place of a stamp.

K

Key

The “K” in CMYK stands for key, as in four-color printing, cyan, magenta, and yellow printing plates are carefully keyed or aligned with the key line of the black key plate. Some sources also suggest that the “K” in CMYK comes from the last letter in “black”.

L

Lithography

A method of printing where metal plates are chemically treated so that the image area accepts ink and non-image areas repel ink.

M

Magenta

Also known as process red; one of the 4 basic ink colors in process color printing; M in abbreviation CMYK.

Matte

Dull non-glossy finish.

Mockup

A product that is handmade by a graphic artist to show how the finished product will look. This is not created on the exact paper stock that the final product will be printed on.

O

Offset Printing

A printing process where the image prints by transferring ink from a plate to a rubber blanket which deposits the ink onto the paper instead of directly from plate to paper.

Offsetting

Transfer of ink or impression from one page to the opposite page.

Overrun

Production of larger quantities than ordered.

P

Pantone Matching Systems (PMS)

The most popular color matching system used in the printing industry. A true PMS color is defined by a mixture of inks that will provide a specific color. PMS colors are often associated with a color code and can be used to produce colors outside the CMYK gamut

Perfect Binding

A bindery method where all pages are trimmed to a single sheet, clamped together, and the cover is wrapped around the spine. The pages are attached to the cover using adhesive.

Perforation

This is created using a die cutting machine or binding machine which stamps a line of small dotted holes for the purpose of tearing off a portion of a printed piece.

Pixels Per Inch (PPI)

Also referred to as Dots Per Inch (DPI), which is a measurement of resolution of a printed image determined by the number of dots that fit into one inch. For optimal results, your image must be at least 300 PPI/DPI at the final output size. Please do not attempt to change a low resolution image to a higher one by changing the PPI/DPI in your image software. Doing so will result in a blurred output.

Plate (Plating)

A metal sheet laser inscribed with an image to be reproduced using a printing press.

PMS (Pantone Matching Systems)

The most popular color matching system used in the printing industry. A true PMS color is defined by a mixture of inks that will provide a specific color. PMS colors are often associated with a color code and can be used to produce colors outside the CMYK gamut

PostScript

A page description language developed by Adobe Systems that tells a printer how an image is to be printed.

PPI (Pixels Per Inch)

Also referred to as Pixels Per Inch (PPI), which is a measurement of resolution of a printed image determined by the number of dots that fit into one inch. For optimal results, your image must be at least 300 DPI/PPI at the final output size. Please do not attempt to change a low resolution image to a higher one by changing the DPI/PPI in your image software. Doing so will result in a blurred output.

Preflight

A procedure used to ensure the submitted artwork is properly prepared for production to industry standard file requirements.

Process colors

The four basic colors used in printing to simulate full spectrum color. Cyan (process blue), magenta (process red), yellow (process yellow), black (process black).

Proof

Provides the opportunity to review and approve the artwork prior to production. Proofs are offered in the form of a PDF or Hard Copy which must be viewed and approved prior to the production of the order product.

R

Raster image

See bitmap image.

Raster Image Processor (RIP)

A device that translates data into dots or pixels.

Rasterize

To render an image, pixel by pixel, vertically and horizontally.

Resolution

The number of dots or pixels of an image. The higher concentration of dots or pixels per inch, the sharper the image will be. Print Runner requires a DPI/PPI of 300 or above. For more information on resolution problems, Click Here.

RGB

Red, Green, and Blue. These are most commonly used with television screens and computer monitors but are not used in offset printing. RGB files should be converted to CMYK. Colors may need to be adjusted after the conversion and may not appear correct on your monitor. 

Rich Black

This is made by mixing colors of ink with black in order to produce a deep, dark black on press. To create rich black for full-color process printing, your CMYK calibration values must be Cyan: 60%, Magenta: 40%, Yellow: 40%, Black (K): 100%

S

Saddle Stitch

A form of binding in the spine of a booklet, catalog, or calendar where staples are used to keep pages together.

Safe Area

An area within the trim line to prevent text or type from being cut off. It is imperative that no text or essential parts of your artwork come within 1/16” of the trim line. Due to mechanical tolerance during the cutting process, any content within 1/16” of the trim line may be cut off. Please refer to our templates for guidelines.

Score

A crease where a sheet of a paper will be folded. This is important to prevent cracking on the edge of the fold, especially with thicker paper stocks.

Self-cover

The paper used as cover is the same as that used in the inside pages.

Spot varnish

Varnishing a specific part of a sheet, while not varnishing the rest.

Stock

The paper or material to be printed on.

Substrate

Any surface or material on which printing is done.

T

Tagged Image File Format (.TIFF)

A standard graphic image file format often used for storing high resolution images that can easily handle up to 24 bits of photographic image color.

Trim marks

 

Trim Size

The final size after cutting is complete

Typesetting

To layout words and text for artwork to be printed

U

Uncoated

Paper with no treatment or coating on the surface.

Under-run

Production of fewer copies than ordered by customer.

UV Coating

A protective coating applied to a printed piece for a glossy finish which enhances colors and provides limited protection against UV and water damaged.

V

Varnish

A clear liquid coating applied to printed sheet for protection and shine.

Vector Images

Images made up of solids, lines and curves that can be scaled or edited without affecting image resolution.

W

Watermark

A distinctive design created in paper during manufacturing that is visible when the paper is held up to the light.

Watermark

An impression incorporated in the paper making process showing the name of the paper and/or the company logo

Wire O binding

A method of binding using double loops of wire through a hole.

With the grain

Folding or feeding paper into the press parallel to the paper's grain or fiber.

Y

Yellow

Also known as process yellow; one of the 4 basic ink colors in process color printing; Y in abbreviation CMYK.